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Go on an Inspiration Walk

  1. Set a timer or alarm for ten minutes. Carry this with you.
  2. Start walking in one direction. Resist the urge to check your phone. Instead, pay attention to your senses: What do you feel, see, hear, smell, taste?
  3. If you struggle to focus, concentrate on your footsteps and notice your feet on the ground. What does the ground feel like? What do you hear as your foot strikes the surface?
  4. When your alarm goes off, return along the same route. See if you notice anything different from your initial journey.
  5. Upon returning to your starting point, set your timer for another ten minutes and write about your experience.

This is an Inspiration Walk.

Note: You’re not walking to solve a problem or cultivate inspiration (though either may occur); you’re walking to walk. Often by focusing on the present, the greatest sources of magic are found…

Tell me what you notice @redheadlefthand.

Promise of a new year

A quick post to remind you that it’s never “too late” to reinvent, create, or switch gears. But you must do so with intention. Start by asking yourself questions about what it is you want to build:

What are you curious about?

What brings you joy?

Which conversations give you energy?

Is there an unfinished dream you keep coming back to?

Who do you admire?

If I can help you sort through any of these questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

I love the promise and hopefulness of a new year. You never know what is around the corner…

12 journal prompts for clarity and growth

The people I work with know how much I love questions. If you’re looking for answers, ask more questions.

Journaling is a priceless tool. And it doesn’t need to be a lengthy process; five minute in the morning is enough to inspire, reveal, clarify, and create. Here are 12 questions to get you started:

  • What does success mean?
  • What does failing look like?
  • Where in your life do you practice “all or nothing” thinking?
  • In what areas might you benefit from a less rigid perspective?
  • Do any of your boundaries stop you from exploring or evolving?
  • How do boundaries serve you?
  • What does it mean to show up imperfectly?
  • During uncertain moments, what do you rely on as you allow experiences to unfold?
  • What are the risks you take when sharing with others?
  • How do you show grace to yourself?
  • When you are tempted to turn inward, how can you challenge yourself to collaborate and create?
  • Who can you show appreciation to today?

Let me know what these questions bring up for you. Tweet me or send a note. We often know the answers we are seeking.

Are you a writer?

There are books, blogs, and courses on how to write. Social media accounts are dedicated to encouraging “non-writers” to commit to daily writing practices, and coaches build followings with promises of completed writing projects. And yes, while there is skill behind knowing how to write well (grammar rules, structure, rhythm) what if all this mystery and magic built up around writing is stopping us from writing in the first place?

What if, instead of waiting for inspiration or the perfect moment, you simply began?

Take away lofty goals and quests for eloquence; simply aim to write a line or two of clunky words. Then, type for ten minutes; the day after that commit to writing for fifteen. Next Saturday, you may find yourself writing for one hour. You may have something solid to chip away at and refine one month later.

Sure, set goals that will keep you on track, but don’t let your questions — What should I write about? Where should I write? When should I write? Which writing program should I use? How do I begin? What if it isn’t any good? — get in your way.

There is a writer in you. And there’s a story that no one else can tell in a way that no one else can tell it. Instead of looking outwards, look inwards. That’s where you will find your process.

When you’re not sure how to begin, continue

Beginning anything is heavy. Expectations and pressure can weigh down even the loftiest ideas — to the point those ideas never catch the wind they need to sail.

Before we start, our ideas grow heavy with fear: this might not work, I don’t know how to begin, my plan is not complete, what will they say, it’s not the right time.

Don’t worry about starting; instead, continue.

Take the gold of what is now and keep going. The future is imaginary.

Don’t waste a moment questioning what is next. Continue.